HR and recruitment a slow-motion train wreck

  HR and recruitment seem to be careering towards a slow-motion train wreck, where is the brake pedal? And what happened to the windscreen? Approximately 10% of the global payroll is squandered on recruitment and HR with not the slightest hint of a measurement to suggest that it returns anything at all. That’s enough money … Read more

Get the most from Interims by engaging directly and forming a partnership up front

If you have read my stuff in the past, you will have heard me talk at times abut the importance of analysing and managing the impact of organisational behaviour in order to make changes happen effectively or indeed to make them happen at all. Even the most complex technical systems I ever rolled out in … Read more

Problem solving relies on what came before and what will come after

Sometimes it is not just what you do but the order in which you do it that matters. You absolutely must develop an ability to see several layers of consequences ahead of the solution as well as several layers of cause and effect behind the problem and then juggle them at once in the way … Read more

The art of The Turnaround

  There was a time when I billed myself as a turnaround specialist. Doing turnarounds was often a fast-track to good long-term relationships for an interim or consultant. I’m not going to bore you with the usual list of coded answers about why they fail, but rather to say that most failures have not actually … Read more

Here’s how we approached the solution

Lernaean Hydra, your time is up. Good management strategy and practice supported by intelligent modern systems Give big data the heave ho Naturally I can’t publish the whole thing if only for sheer volume, let alone sensitivity of information from some of the underlying cases, but I will pick a few areas just to demonstrate … Read more

The trap of settling for mediocrity

The trap of settling for mediocrity Without boring you with a treatise on macro-economics, I can only get my point across by saying that, not only is every professional and tradesperson in our world challenged to know less and possess fewer skills, but most business we are employed by will have not a single individual … Read more

Specialist in Smarties, Chocolate Beer consultant, or Expert in customer complaints from Obese women on Tuesday afternoons.

Are you a specialist? By the way these specialisms do exist and I have no doubt you could add to my collection. If you want a light hearted look visit this article. As an interim connected to the technology world, I get a lot of calls and emails from recruiters and over the years the, … Read more

How much damage can negative BIAS do to performance and quality of life?

Whether a manager, a sports person, an investor, or a dustman It is vital to understand our personal bias and manage it . Every decision we make requires some level of objectivity to stand a good chance of serving us well. “You’re faced with around 11 million pieces of information at any given moment, according … Read more

The agile organisation – a risky proposition

What did Bill Gates mean and what did it mean to Microsoft to be agile. Well Bill made the mother of all misjudgements when he said that the internet was of no interest to Microsoft and dismissed its potential. Within one and a half years, Microsoft had changed its mind, won the browser war with Netscape and delivered ASP, the first and still dominant commercial application server for the internet. That was agile, but it had not a thing to do with stand up meetings around whiteboards and walls covered in scribbles.

Scope a real ball breaker, do we really have to master it?

The fastest cheapest way from A to B

It has been well established and indeed I have blogged about this in more detail previously, that without question the fastest cheapest and most certain way form A to B is to establish where B is and how to recognise it when you arrive, break the journey into easily managed stages and then follow your plan.

If however; as is sometimes the case, B is can not be defined objectively and/or there are no maps available for the territory in between, then you need to take a more agile approach and allow for the extra time and cost, but balance it against the reward.

Bridging the gap between the web and the real world part 5

What’s the right strategy for me? Previously: Bridging between the web and the real world Bridging the gap between the web and the real world part 2 Bridging the gap between the web and the real world part 3 Bridging the gap between the web and the real world part 4   In defining a … Read more

Bridging the gap between the web and the real world part 3

There is a fairly popular and utterly flawed theory that underlies most networking activity, which supports the latter folly and it goes something like this:
If you meet the same 60 people every month for a year and you tell them what you do and then you are nice to them every time you meet and if you pass a few scraps of leads to a few of them, eventually one of them will order from you.
The reasons it’s flawed are simply these: